Archive for January, 2014

Happy Birthday to our Two-Year Olds!

dingo zoo attraction

The zoo’s dingo puppies celebrate their second birthday on Thursday, January 30.  Zoo keepers hosted an early birthday party complete with enrichment-based gifts.  The gifts, which were made by zoo volunteers, included cardboard “animals” and paper mache balls.  (For more on animal enrichment, visit our website.)

Their litter includes seven pups, five of which still reside here at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo.  (Male dingo Brumby and female dingo Elzey now live at the Cleveland Zoo.)

The dingoes that celebrated here in Fort Wayne included:

  • Mawson (male)
  • Tingoora (female)
  • Bunyip (male)
  • Airlie (female)
  • Yengo (male)

 

 Bunyip, Mawson, and Tingoora became especially engaged with their cardboard surprises.  Click on the video to watch their reaction!

 

 

 Click on the images below to enlarge:

Posted in: Enrichment, Zoo News

How Many Keepers Does it take to Hold a Python?

reticulated python zoo attraction

When Bo the reticulated python got his annual physical last week, it took seven people just to hold onto this unusual patient in the Indonesian Rain Forest.

At 15’ 3” long, Bo is 61 pounds of pure muscle and squirmed mightily to express his displeasure at this visit from the vet. 

Reticulated Python zoo attraction
It took seven zoo keepers to hold Bo during his annual vet exam.

Zoo staffers get their hands on this powerful snake only once a year, so despite Bo’s protests, zoo veterinarians Dr. Joe Smith and Dr. Kami Fox wanted to examine every inch of him (one hundred eighty-three inches, to be exact!) 

Lead snake keeper Dave Messmann held Bo’s head while other keepers and veterinary staff lined up to stretch out the snake.  Keepers inspected Bo’s skin, looking for irregularities in his scales or lumps under the skin. 

Messmann gently held Bo’s mouth open with a rubber spatula so Dr. Fox could examine the snake’s teeth.  A string was run down Bo’s spine to determine his exact length, and Dr. Fox drew blood from Bo’s tail for testing. 

“Bo is a healthy snake,” said Dr. Smith after the exam.  As if he was trying to prove his excellent physical condition, Bo downed a tasty rat immediately after being returned to his exhibit.

Posted in: Indonesian Rain Forest, Reptiles

This Job Never Gets Cold

A diver chats with guests at the Fort Wayne Children's Zoo

After spending 113 hours and 36 minutes under water in 2013, the zoo’s Dive Team is far from “all wet!” The divers, along with support from staff on the dry side, completed 85 dives last year in their quest to keep the zoo’s Great Barrier Reef tanks sparkling clean.  

Though the 78 degree water temperature sounds balmy, Aquarium Area Manager and Dive Safety Officer Gary Stoops says divers need to wear wet suits to retain body heat, which is lost faster in water than in air.  The thick wet suits also protect divers from aggressive fish.  “Some of the fish are very territorial.  The triggerfish and even the zebra moray eel have been known to challenge the divers, and even nip at their wet suits.”

The shark tank is a different story.  No diver has ever been bitten during a dive with the blacktip reef sharks.  “They just stay away from us,” states Stoops.

When the zoo is open for the season, guests can witness dives and can even get involved in an interactive dive chat!  Divers are outfitted with a speaker and microphone that  allow for live question-and-answer sessions.  Dive Chats are held every Wednesday and Thursday at 1:30 PM.

All-told, divers spend about 90 minutes in the water during each dive.  Most of that time is spent cleaning the coral, and of course avoiding the eel.  At 15, he is the aquarium’s oldest resident and is an expert at defending his territory.

Posted in: Aquarium

New Year, New Babies!

Tentacled snake 100x100

Zoo keepers got a big surprise last month when a tentacled snake in the Indonesian Rain Forest gave birth to seven babies overnight!

Zoo keepers knew that the female snake was pregnant, but weren’t sure when the babies would arrive.  An ultrasound done in December revealed a tangle of little snakes inside the mother.

Dr. Kami Fox, the zoo’s veterinary intern states that the length of gestation and anticipated due date for tentacled snakes is difficult to determine.  “We try to assess how far along they are via ultrasound but rarely do we witness the actual birth.  In this particular case, the snake gave birth during the night and in the morning we observed the new babies.” 

Tentacled snakes are ovoviviparous, which means they produce eggs inside their body, but instead of laying eggs they give birth to live young.  Here’s how it works:  The unborn snakes are nourished via egg yolk (the mother has no placenta), and the eggs hatch prior to birth.  The mother snake then delivers live young.

Tentacled snakes are ambush hunters. According to Zoo Keeper Dave Messmann, “They use their tails to anchor themselves and wait for their prey.”  At this point, the unique tentacles for which the species is named allow the snake to sense vibration from the unsuspecting prey – usually a small fish.  Once the predator becomes aware of its prey it strikes with its mouth.  The strike is lightning-fast, lasting only a matter of milliseconds. 

Baby tentacled snakes begin hunting just hours after birth.  According to Dr. Fox, “The babies come out hungry so we provide size-appropriate fish for them.”

Our veterinary team performed an ultrasound on a pregnant tentacled snake. Click for video.

 

 The only known predator to tentacled snakes is humans.

Posted in: Baby Animals, Indonesian Rain Forest, Reptiles