The Private Life of Hornbills

Here at The Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo we have a pair of Wrinkled Hornbills (Aceros corrugatus), Bayu (Bye-you) and Ayu (Aye-you). Bayu, which means “the wind” in Indonesian, is our 16 year old male and Ayu, meaning “beautiful,” is our 13 year old female. You can tell them apart based on their size and coloration; males are larger and have bright yellow and red heads and beaks while the females are smaller and darker in color.

If you visited our Zoo this summer, it might have looked like there was only one bird in the Wrinkled Hornbill exhibit. But fear not; our female, Ayu, had a very busy summer sealing herself into her nest box. During nesting season, the female will seal herself inside of the nest box using wood shavings, sticky food, and feces. We made sure that the pair was provided with all the things that they need to be successful, such as adding foods like figs and boiled sweet potatoes to their diets to help them seal up the opening. Ayu worked on and off sealing the nest box for a couple of days before sealing herself in fully. She does not leave the nest box until the nesting process is over, but she leaves a very small opening so that Bayu can feed her.

The last time that Ayu was seen outside of the nest box was July 16th. Once inside and sealed, females can lay between one to three eggs and will incubate them for about 28 days until they hatch. They then remain inside the nest box with the chicks until they are strong enough to emerge. This could take another 60 to 80 days! That means females stay inside their nest box for a total of around 90 days and throughout all this time the male is focused on feeding everyone in the nest box and protecting them from predators.

On August 24th, a keeper heard a small vocalization that could have been a chick. At that point, Ayu had been in the nest box for 39 days. It was confirmed in the following days that there was a chick that had hatched!  We helped determine that a chick had hatched based on what foods Bayu was picking to feed Ayu. Chicks are usually fed higher protein items when they are young and when Bayu immediately started feeding Ayu mealworms and crickets we were pretty confident that we had a hornbill chick.

Based on our timeline, we hoped that Ayu and the chick would break out of the nest box before the end of the season. Wrinkled Hornbills are native to Indonesia, and are very sensitive to the cold Indiana temperatures. As the temperatures started dropping, we began to worry about Bayu. Since he had to stay outside to feed Ayu, he was especially susceptible to the weather. After conferring with vet staff and keepers, it was finally decided to move the nest box (with the chick and mom still sealed tightly inside) indoors for the winter. It was quite the process, but our team was able to safely relocate the heavy box inside so that the hornbills could be warm for the winter and emerge from the nest box when they were ready.

The 90 day mark came and went and still the chick and its mother did not emerge. Finally, on the 123rd day of the female’s nesting process, our animal care team decided to break the seal and see if the birds would break out. Once that seal was broken, Ayu and the chick emerged within minutes! At this point, the chick was 84 days old. After the neonatal physical a few days later, it was determined that the chick was a female, and was given the name Nuri, which means “colorful bird.”

Though it was a long and tedious process to produce a single chick, it was well worth it. In fact, our chick Nuri was one of only two Wrinkled Hornbill chicks to successfully hatch this year in any zoo! This represents a huge achievement for their species, whose population is suffering in the wild. Because of our animal care team’s hard work, we are excited that we have made steps toward saving this endangered bird.

Look at those eyelashes!

 

Written by: Tiffany Jones and Brianna Crane: Zoo Keepers, Indonesian Rain Forest

Wild Orangutans on vines

Trick-Or(angutan)-Treat

Humans are clearing millions of acres of rain forest in Asia, Africa, and South America every year. In Sumatra and Borneo, these forests were once home to many species, like Sumatran orangutans. Now, plantations in these countries produce the most palm oil in the world, displacing these great apes.­

Sumatra and Borneo are the only native habitats for orangutans. With the slowest reproductive rate of any mammal (six to ten years) and devastating habitat loss, the wild orangutan population has declined from 300,000 to lower than 45,000 in 14 years (1990–2004). The Sumatran orangutan species may have dropped as low as 6,600.

Plantations in Borneo and Sumatra produced more than 44 million metric tons of palm oil in 2009, and the number is rising. It is the most widely spread edible oil because it is used in thousands of products, including health care products, pet foods, and candy.

Palm oils themselves are not the problem; it is the sustainability of the product. Plantations can produce more edible oil on the same plot of land than any other oil, but some companies are choosing to destroy more forest area using wildfire techniques instead of replanting.

As we purchase candy for our upcoming Wild Zoo Halloween event, we are keeping the orangutans in mind by checking labels — and you should too! But be aware, there are more than 50 different names for palm oil on product labels. Check out this helpful sustainable palm oil candy brand guide.

For more information regarding the palm oil crisis, visit the Orangutan Conservancy website.

Zoo Vet Saves Wild Birds from Predatory Snake

Click on the Photos to See Dr. Smith’s Field Journal from the Mariana Islands:


How the Snake Became a Threat And What We’re Doing to Save the Birds:

North of Guam in the Pacific Ocean is an archipelago of volcanic islands known as the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands. Two of those islands, Tinian and Saipan, are home to birds found nowhere else on earth. Those birds have thrived inside a utopia without natural predators. However, a new threat emerged during World War II.

The War made its way to Guam in the early 1940s and with it came boats, planes, and cargo. A stowaway species, the brown tree snake, found its way onto Guam and became established. This was a big problem for the birds of Guam, which had evolved without fear of predation. They were not adapted to defend against the invasive snake and made easy prey for the newcomer! The brown tree snake has also been sighted in the Mariana Islands.

The brown tree snake continues to threaten bird populations today. A not-for-profit group called Pacific Bird Conservation (PBC) is working to save the birds of the Mariana Islands, and they’ve enlisted the help of thought-leaders from zoos around the world.

Dr. Joe Smith, Director of Animal Programs at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo, spent two weeks in the islands serving as a veterinary advisor to PBC’s Marianas Avifauna Conservation (MAC) Program. According to PBC’s website, the MAC Program “is intended to provide the avifauna of the Mariana archipelago with the best possible chances for long-term survival.*”

How does the MAC Program accomplish their goal?

“It’s a twenty-four-year plan,” says Dr. Smith, “and each year the program picks one or two bird species. We carefully capture the birds in large nets, then retain them for captive breeding or translocate them to another island in the chain where brown tree snakes are not detected.” This year, the team translocated Tinian monarchs and bridled white-eyes to the remote island of Guguan.

Why breed some bird species and translocate others?

“Some species are good candidates for captive breeding and others are not. Captive breeding has saved other birds from extinction, including the Guam rail. However, one of the species included in this year’s project was the Tinian monarch, a type of flycatcher. Flycatchers eat on the fly and it can be challenging for us to maintain them in captivity. Including translocation as a conservation strategy offers them the best chance of survival.”

The MAC Program also focused on the bridled white-eye this year. For this species, both captive breeding and translocation are being utilized as conservation strategies.

PBC set out to collect 50 birds of each species during the 2016 collection effort. A team of zoo professionals collected 102 individual birds and translocated them to a different island. The MAC Program also provides food and veterinary care for the birds until they can be released. Prior to release, each bird received a physical exam, blood collection, fecal parasite check, and unique leg bands that will allow it to be identified as an individual in the future. All told, the team spent three weeks on the islands of Guam, Tinian, Saipan, and Guguan.

The project will continue in 2017, with a focus on saving the rufous fantail and the Mariana fruit dove. Dr. Smith expects the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo will continue its yearly commitment to the MAC Program. The zoo has actively participated in the MAC Program since 2014.

Why does a zoo in Fort Wayne, Indiana care so much about wildlife in the middle of the Pacific Ocean? Dr. Smith offers a conservationist’s perspective, “Every species has inherent value. We are all part of the same planet. Humans caused this ecological disruption, and it’s up to us to fix it.”

*(http://www.pacificbirdconservation.org/mariana-conservation-program-mac.html, accessed 5/16/16)

Zoo Season Prep: Our Rain Forest Dome Got A Massive Trim

Conditions inside the zoo’s Rain Forest Dome are so good for tree growth that the forest below can get, well…overshadowed.

That’s when we bring in the chainsaws (and the professionals) to give the zoo’s rain forest trees a massive trim.

“We have to trim the trees back to allow light for the smaller plants,” says Kim Weldon, zoo gardener.  Some of the smaller plants in the rain forest include exotic orchids and also spices like cinnamon, cardamom, and vanilla.  Guests can even find bamboo growing along the path!

“Bonsai mindset” is the term Weldon uses to describe her approach to maintaining the dome’s small and mid-size plants.  “I try to keep things interesting and mix in new things every year.”  Weldon also oversees the bi-annual trimming of the larger trees that can grow as high as the top of the dome – up to 40 feet tall!

Weldon remembers bringing the large trees into the zoo when the Indonesian Rain Forest was built in 1994.  “We had to block off part of Sherman Boulevard.  That was over 20 years ago and those trees are still growing.”

Some of the tree species in the Indonesian Rain Forest are midnight horror and malay apple.

Take a moment to enjoy the exotic trees, delicate orchids, and fragrant spices on your next stroll through the zoo’s Indonesian Rain Forest, and remember that while the zoo’s rain forest trees are protected, wild rain forests are disappearing at an alarming rate.  Sustainable farming is critical to protect remaining rain forest habitat, especially in the palm oil industry.  You can make choices at home that encourage sustainable palm oil farming:  Choose products that are free of palm oil or products from companies that participate in the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO).  Your choices can help to protect trees in the wild – It’s easier than many people expect!  Click here for a handy shopping guide.

Click on the photos to enlarge:

See a Baby Orangutan’s First Birthday Party

Zoo keepers had a birthday party for Asmara the baby orangutan and her “auntie” Melati this week.  Thirty years separate the two (Asmara turned 1 on Nov. 22 and Melati turned 31 on Nov. 19) but we think an orangutan is never too young or too old to be celebrated!

The party began when Asmara went into her exhibit with mom Tara.  They ignored the wrapped “gifts” that keepers had placed in the exhibit, instead opting to climb way up to the skylights.

When male orangutan Tengku joined the party, he swung skillfully to the back wall to taste the “Happy Birthday” message keepers had written in flour paste.  Next, he snatched up several gifts and began tearing them open to discover the treats that keepers had hidden inside.

What was Asmara’s favorite gift?  A nearly-empty jar of peanut butter.  The little one watched intently as Tara scraped out the tasty treat.  At one point, Asmara tried unsuccessfully to put her head in the jar!

Want to give baby Asmara the best birthday gift ever?  Adopt an orangutan at the zoo.  Your unrestricted gift will help us pay for Asmara’s food and care for one whole year!

Click on the photos to enlarge:

Animal babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.

zoo nature fort wayne

We Have a Kids4Nature 2015 Winner!

Sumatran Tiger – 93,378 votes – Winner!

Giraffe – 88,345 votes

Hellbender – 64,212 votes

kids4nature_logo

How Kids4Nature Works

On every visit, guests received a recycled metal washer that represented 10 cents. Guests could then “vote” for their favorite project by dropping the washer in the wishing well.  Votes helped determine how much funding each project receives.

Additional votes could be made with real quarters, nickels, and dimes – 100% of any added contributions went toward the voted project. Total contributions were calculated from April – October.

Click on the photos to see this year’s Kids4Nature animals:

These three projects will share 50% of the zoo’s $80,000 conservation commitment in 2015, with the allocation proportional to the number of votes received.  The other 50% of Kids4Nature funds will be shared by our Conservation Partners.

The Sumatran tiger won the most votes (and a year’s worth of bragging rights for our own Indah and Bugara), but ALL of the zoo’s conservation projects win when our guests care about conservation.  Thank you to all who voted at the Kids4Nature kiosk in 2015 to show your support of wild animals and wild places.

otter pumpkin

Animals Go Wild For Pumpkins

Tigers gotta gnaw, otters gotta play, and penguins – well, they’re just penguins!  Zoo critters showed off their animal instincts at the annual Pumpkin Stomp & Chomp as part of last week’s Wild Zoo Halloween festivities.

The award for most action-packed pumpkin encounter went to tigers Indah and Bugara, who attacked their pumpkins at full pounce, then batted them around like rubber toys.  The lemurs practically climbed inside their treat-laden pumpkins.  Some animals, like the sea lions, were more interested in the candy-bag-toting, costumed kids than their pumpkins. Once zoo keepers took the lid off a bamboo-stuffed pumpkin, the red pandas finally figured out that pumpkins aren’t so bad after all.  The penguins, however, were completely indifferent to their smiling jack-o-lantern.

Why did we give pumpkins to zoo animals?  Watching the animals nibble, gnaw, gnarl, play, and sometimes devour their pumpkins is a treat for guests, and provides valuable enrichment for the animals. Enrichment stimulates the animals’ natural behaviors and offers physical and mental challenges.

Click on the photos to find out what the animals did with their pumpkins: