Goat close up with watermark|fort wayne children's zoo

9 Tips For Making the Most of Your Zoo Visit (Goats are #7)

No summer vacation is complete without a trip to the zoo!  Here are nine tips for making the most of your zoo visit:

#1 – Catch a FREE sea lion show.  They happen at Sea Lion Beach every day at 11AM and 3PM.

#2 – Buy a ride pass.  You’ll get 12 rides for the price of 10…and don’t worry if you don’t use all 12 in one day.  Ride passes never expire!

#3 – Visit our newest babies.  Asmara the baby Sumatran orangutan lives in the zoo’s Indonesian Rain Forest and there’s a new colobus monkey baby in the African Journey.  Our kangaroo mob has a new joey that just started venturing out of the pouch.

#4 – Feed a giraffe.  You can buy a piece of lettuce at the giraffe platform for 1 token ($1).  One of our friendly giraffes might come up and eat it right out of your hand!

#5 – Turn your zoo trip into a learning experience.  Visit the For Educators page on our website for ideas and resources.

#6 – Chat with a volunteer.  Our amazing volunteers love talking with guests and sharing their passion for animals and education.  Zoo volunteers are easy to spot – they wear bright red shirts with the zoo logo.

#7 – Make a friend at the Indiana Family Farm.  You’re allowed to pet many of the animals in the barn, including goats, sheep, and donkeys.  Ask a zoo keeper or volunteer for help if you’re not sure how to approach an animal.  They’re there to help.

#8 – Try some new fare.  You’ll find lots of new menu items at our remodeled concession stands.

#9 – Share your memories.  Post your pictures to our Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter feeds.  Your photo could be featured on the front page at kidszoo.org!

broom and drill with watermark

Spring Cleaning, Zoo-Style

If you think spring cleaning your house is a chore, consider spring cleaning the entire zoo!  As we count down to Opening Day on April 25, our staff is busy all over our 40 acre property.  Here are some of the items we’ll be checking off our list:

  • Drain and power-wash Sea Lion Beach
  • Vacuum and scrub the penguin grottos
  • Cut and hang tree limbs to use as perches in exhibits
  • Sweep all walkways and guest areas
  • Plant flowers and beautify landscaping
  • Install new exhibit signage
  • Update concession stand signage (Look for new menu items this year!)
  • Paint, paint, paint
  • Mulch, mulch, mulch

…And this list is certainly NOT exhaustive!  Zoo director Jim Anderson expresses his appreciation for all the work that goes into Opening Day, “Our staff works very hard to leave no stone unturned in the weeks preceding zoo opening.  We all want to deliver a perfect experience to zoo guests.  Thousands of details add up to one impressive finished product!”

We look forward to sharing the zoo with you in 2015.

 

Click on the photos to enlarge:

Dr. Ricko Jaya and Dr. Yenny Saraswati 600pxl

Veterinarians Unite to Save Orangutans

Fort Wayne recently hosted two important conservationists: Indonesian veterinarians Yenny Saraswati and  Ricko Jaya are saving wild Sumatran orangutans with the support of the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo.

Dr. Yenny is a senior veterinarian with the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme (SOCP), which reintroduces Sumatran orangutans into the wild after they’ve been confiscated from the pet trade.  Keeping critically endangered Sumatran orangutans as pets is illegal in Indonesia.

“We want to put wild orangutans back in the forest,” states Dr. Yenny, “but it’s not simple.  After they are rescued we have to screen for diseases and rehabilitate the dietary problems that human food has caused.”  Dr. Yenny’s visit to the United States helped her better understand advanced animal care.  “At the Fort Wayne Zoo and the Cleveland Zoo we observed medical procedures with orangutans.  These good medical practices are something we can apply to the orangutans we rehabilitate.”

Dr. Yenny is interested in animal care because the SOCP is developing an animal sanctuary called Orangutan Haven in northeastern Sumatra, which will hold Sumatran orangutans who are no longer able to thrive in the wild.

Dr. Ricko knows the plight of exploited orangutans all too well.  He is a veterinarian and rescuer with the Human Orangutan Conflict Response Unit (HOCRU) which responds to reports of illegally-kept orangutans and calls regarding human-orangutan conflicts.  Dr. Ricko enters potentially dangerous situations to physically remove the orangutans and literally carry the animals to safety.

“We try to mitigate conflicts between humans and orangutans with education, but sometimes the orangutans are already in need of medical treatment when we rescue them,” stated Dr. Ricko, “We work closely with SOCP to determine whether the orangutans can be released into the wild without additional human intervention.  If so, we release them into a national park.  We try to have as little human contact as possible, but sometimes medical intervention is required.”

Dr. Ricko explained that caring for captive animals differs from field work. “With wild animals, there is no medical recall.  We just have to observe and give them the care we think they need.  Seeing the treatment of captive animals has given me a new set of concerns and knowledge.”

In addition to emergency medical care and public education and outreach programs, the HOCRU works with local governments to develop stronger wildlife protection laws.

The transcontinental visit also benefited the zoo staff here.  Zoo veterinarian Joe Smith said, “Spending a month with Ricko and Yenny stimulated numerous conversations about diseases of orangutans, styles of medicine, available equipment, and even things like culture, politics, and traditions. While the main objective was for them to learn how orangutans are cared for in the United States, my staff, my family, and I probably learned just as much if not more in return.”

Click on the photos to enlarge:

orangutans fort wayne zoo

First Photos! – Baby Asmara Explores Her Exhibit

Asmara, a 16-week old Sumatran orangutan at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo, went into Orangutan Valley for the first time last week. Until now, Asmara and her mother, Tara, have been living in an off-exhibit bedroom adjacent to the main exhibit.

On their first day in the exhibit, Asmara clung tightly to her mother as Tara explored high up in the trees.  Zoo keeper Angie Selzer watched nervously, buy all went well. “Tara climbed very high right away, but Asmara clung tightly just like she would in the wild,” she said.

Prior to the big day, the exhibit underwent extensive baby-proofing.  Zoo keepers covered the floor with soft straw and checked the trees, walls, and vines for potential safety issues.  The City of Fort Wayne’s tree crews even got involved, helping to reinforce the vines and hammocks.

Will you get to see Tara and Asmara when the zoo opens on April 25?  Zoo keepers are working toward that goal. Indonesian Rain Forest area manager Tanisha Dunbar explained, “The goal is to mix all four of our orangutans behind-the-scenes, and once they’re comfortable, we’ll let them all go out on exhibit together,” said Dunbar.  “And they always have a choice.  They can choose whether or not to go out each morning, although Tara’s never been one to stay behind-the-scenes.”

Born on November 22 to Tara and her mate, Tengku, Asmara is important to the future of Sumatran orangutans, which are Critically Endangered.  About 320 Sumatran orangutans live in zoos worldwide, and an average of 15 babies are born each year in the world’s zoos. In the wild, these red-furred apes are found only on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, where the population is in drastic decline due to illegal hunting and the destruction of their forest homes to build palm oil plantations.

Fewer than 7,000 Sumatran orangutans remain in the wild. Some experts predict orangutans could become extinct in the wild within a few decades if circumstances remain unchanged.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Javan Whistling Duck Gwen with Reflection

This New Couple Gets Along Swimmingly

Lewis, a Javan whistling duck and longtime resident of the zoo’s Indonesian Rain Forest, welcomed a new friend last week.

Gwen is a female Javan whistling duck from North Carolina.  She came to the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo so that Lewis could have a companion.

“He was medically healthy but we could tell he was lonely,” stated zoo keeper Tiffany Jones.  “He spent a lot of time just sitting on his log not doing anything.”

Zoo keepers know that animal introductions can be a sensitive process and sometimes animals need time and space as they acclimate to one another.   In the case of Lewis and Gwen, however, the animals bonded instantly.

Jones observed, “Lewis was asleep on his log when we brought Gwen to the pond.  As soon as she got in the water he woke up, swam over and whistled to her.  They have been together ever since.  I don’t think he’s lonely anymore.”

The two ducks look and behave very similar, but Gwen is a bit smaller than Lewis and her coloring is more contrasted.  (The feathers on her back are much darker than those on her underside.)  Come out to the zoo when we reopen this Spring and see if you can spot the differences!

Zoo officials are happy to report that at the end of one week Lewis and Gwen are still getting along swimmingly.

Click on the photos to enlarge:

zoo keepers in snow

Zoo Keepers Turn Snow into Fun

This week’s snowfall is creating big fun for zoo keepers and animals.  The extra clean-up is all in a day’s work, and zoo keepers welcomed the challenge with a fun and enriching attitude.

“We shoveled snow off the top of the lynx exhibit yesterday.  It was cold and the snow was heavy but Ashley [Hubbard] and I enjoyed the work,” said zoo keeper Rachel Purcell after spending Monday morning heaving loads of snow in below-freezing weather.  It was important that zoo keepers inspect the safety of all animal exhibits after Sunday night’s record snowfall, and ensure that the structures were sound.

Once the animals’ safety was in check, it was time to have a little fun with the 10+ inches of snow that nature sent our way.  Animal enrichment happens every day at the zoo, and snow provides unique opportunities for enrichment that aren’t available during the warmer months..  Animal enrichment means “providing a stimulating environment that offers physical and mental challenges for an animal.”

For the goats in the Indiana Family Farm, enrichment usually involves a snack.  Each time it snows, and when the weather is above 15 degrees, zoo keepers Heather Schuh and Kylie Kuchinsky let the goats outside for a taste of mother nature’s frozen treat.  “Yesterday we built them a snowman with food in it,” states Kuchinsky.  “They especially like molasses.”

For some zoo animals, it’s too cold to go outside during the winter months.  The Javan gibbons in the Indonesian Rainforest stay indoors in their behind-the-scenes area when the weather gets chilly, but that doesn’t mean they’re left out of the fun.  Zoo keeper Taylor Muzzillo brought the outdoors in this week when he offered the gibbons fresh snow flavored with sugar free drink mix.

Muzzillo loaded a large bucket with snow and brought it indoors.  He then built small enrichment stations in different places around the gibbons’ behind-the-scenes area.  The enrichment Muzzillo provided fell into three categories: textural, edible, and sensory – all of which provide stimulation for the animals.

“They like their snow,” stated Muzzillo.  “As soon as I open the door they all come swinging in.”

Click on the photos to enlarge:

baby orangutan fort wayne childrens zoo

Baby Orangutan Turns Two Months Old

Baby Asmara turns 2 months old this week!  The critically endangered Sumatran orangutan was born at the zoo on November 22.  Her parents are Tara and Tengku, two of the zoo’s adult orangutans.  Asmara and mom Tara are doing well behind-the-scenes and zoo fans frequently send us questions via social media about the baby.

Angie Selzer is a zoo keeper who cares for the orangutans.  She was present during Tara’s labor and witnessed the delivery of Asmara.  Selzer explains the day-to-day life of Asmara, “She spends all of her time with her mom.  Most of the time she’s nursing or sleeping in her nest.  She grips onto her mom well.”

Developing a strong grip is important for orangutans.  As Asmara grows she’ll begin climbing and swinging from tree to tree.  Selzer reports that Asmara’s development is progressing normally and that Tara is gradually introducing some early independence into her baby’s routine, “Tara is doing a really good job.  She gives Asmara tummy time and has been showing Asmara how to grip onto things other than just mom.”

Dr. Joe Smith is the zoo’s veterinarian.  He explains why the vet staff and keepers have chosen to limit behind-the-scenes access to media and even to most zoo staff, “Orangutan infants have a naïve immune system, just like human babies do, and they can contract many of the same diseases that we humans can carry.  Plus, we’re right in the middle of flu season so we’re choosing to be cautious.”

Dr. Smith stated that baby Asmara’s development is going well and that her vet staff and keepers do not have any medical concerns at this time.

About 320 Sumatran orangutans live in zoos worldwide, and an average of 15 babies are born each year in the world’s zoos. In the wild, these red-furred apes are found only on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, where the population is in drastic decline due to illegal hunting and the destruction of their forest homes to build palm oil plantations. Fewer than 7,000 Sumatran orangutans remain in the wild. Some experts predict orangutans could become extinct in the wild within a few decades if circumstances remain unchanged.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

 

 

toads fort wayne zoo

Yes, Toads are Cute.

Really, they are! —————–>

 OK, so maybe you’re still on the fence about whether toads are cute or just plain toad-looking.  Take a look at the photos below.  The fire-bellied toads in the Indonesian Rain Forest welcomed several groups of babies this year, and they definitely get a “cute” vote from the staff here at the zoo!

Want to help native toads and frogs?  Participate in FrogWatch and help gather data about amphibians in your backyard.  Training classes are coming up in February.

Click on the photos to enlarge and see our baby toads grow up:

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.

Baby orangutan, 2 weeks

7 FAQs about our Baby Orangutan Answered

Tara, a Sumatran orangutan at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo, delivered a healthy baby girl on November 22.  Zoo staff named the baby Asmara, which means “love,” and she is the first Sumatran orangutan born at any zoo in the United States in 2014.  Asmara represents a significant addition to the population of critically endangered Sumatran orangutans, and the zoo has received many questions on Facebook and Twitter about this special little ape.

Here are the answers to 7 Frequently Asked Questions about baby Asmara:

Q:  When can people see the baby?
A:  Mom Tara and baby Asmara are getting to know one another and only limited zoo staff are permitted to see them.  This is to allow quiet bonding time for the pair.  We expect that Tara and Asmara will be out on exhibit when the zoo reopens on April 25.

Q:  Will the new baby stay in Fort Wayne?
A:  Sumatran orangutans are critically endangered.  The Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo participates in the Species Survival Program managed by the AZA. As such, we work with the program to ensure genetic diversity in zoos and sometimes animals are called to live elsewhere. While we don’t know all that the future will hold, we do know that orangutans mature slowly and Tara’s baby will require maternal care for the next 6-8 years.

Q:  Where are Asmara and Tara right now?
A:  They’re currently living in the orangutan bedrooms, which are adjacent to the orangutan exhibit.  They share a bedroom separate from the other orangutans.

Q:  Do the zoo keepers get to hold and feed the baby?
A:  Zoo keepers have not fed Asmara, nor have they handled her.  Tara is doing everything she should to care for her baby, including nursing.

Q:  Who delivered Asmara?
A:  Zoo keepers observed Tara’s delivery in case of complications but did not assist.  Tara delivered her baby on her own.

Q:  Has Tengku met his baby yet?
A:  Tara has been in a separate bedroom from adult orangutans Tengku (Asmara’s father) and Melati since about a week before giving birth. All the orangutans have had visual and auditory contact the entire time, through labor, delivery and afterwards.  Both Tengku and Melati are interested in the baby.

Q:  Will all the orangutans ever be allowed to share the same space?
A:  Yes, eventually.  When zoo keepers do start introductions, it will be gradual through a mesh barrier first and then physical contact in the behind-the-scenes area.  The current plan will be to introduce Tengku with Tara and Asmara first and then to introduce Melati to the group.

 

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Zoo Names Baby Orangutan

A baby Sumatran orangutan born at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo on November 22 has a name – one that reflects how special she is to the zoo and the entire population of these endangered apes. Her name is Asmara, which translates to “love” in Indonesian.

Now 11 days old, Asmara and her mother, 19-year-old Tara, are bonding behind-the-scenes at the zoo’s orangutan exhibit. Asmara is developing normally and Tara is providing excellent maternal care. Like all orangutan infants, Asmara clings to her mother constantly and will continue to do so for the next several months.

As the only Sumatran orangutan to be born in a United States zoo so far in 2014, Asmara represents an important addition to the zoo-dwelling orangutan population.  About 320 Sumatran orangutans live in zoos worldwide, and only about 15 babies are born each year in the world’s zoos.  Fewer than 7,000 Sumatran orangutans remain in the wild forests of Sumatra, Indonesia.

The breeding Tara with 28-year-old Tengku was recommended by the Orangutan Species Survival Plan, a program of the Association of Zoos & Aquariums that seeks to maintain genetic diversity within zoo-dwelling populations of endangered and threatened animals.

Because Asmara is Tara’s first baby and Tara has never observed another female caring for an infant, officials were concerned that she may not know how to care for her baby.   Zoo staff had extensive plans in place should Tara fail to provide care, but so far, none of those measures have been needed.

Zoo fans can watch for baby photos on the zoo’s Facebook and Twitter pages in the coming weeks.  Zoo guests will have their first chance to see the new baby when the zoo opens for the season on April 25.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge: