prairie dog|fort wayne children's zoo

What’s Up, Little Pup?

The zoo’s prairie dog exhibit has a reason for excitement:  a fluffy, cute new pup surfaced last week!  Zoo keepers first spotted the youngster on June 24, but based on the baby’s size they estimate that he or she was born some time in April.

Zoo keepers suspected that a baby had been born when the town (group of prairie dogs) suddenly became elusive and began spending most of the day underground.  Zoo keeper Helena Lacey has observed the pup above-ground and reported that the little one is taking an interest in solid food.  Lacey stated that zoo keepers have not been able to determine whether the baby is male or female.

Now that the pup has surfaced, zoo staff is hopeful that the town will spend more time above ground.  The new baby is fairly easy to discern from the adults.  He or she is extra-fluffy and still smaller than the others.  Here’s a handy “field guide” for pup identification:

prairie dog pup|fort wayne children's zoo

Click on the photos to enlarge:

Video by zoo keeper Helena Lacey:

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click here to meet more zoo babies!

A Double-Dose of Zoo Baby Cuteness

There’s a double-dose of cuteness at the ring-tailed lemur exhibit – Cushla the lemur had twins!

The babies were born June 10.  Now two weeks old, they’re spending time outside and getting acquainted with their troop in their exhibit.  The twins are still nursing and spend all their time clinging to mom, but they often peek out to get a look at zoo guests.

“They are doing well,” states zoo keeper Stephanie Raiman.  “They can be seen on exhibit most days, unless it is raining. They are starting to poke their heads out more and look around.”  Raiman recommends that guests first look for the adult lemur with the shortest tail (that’s Cushla, the mother).  Once they spot mom, it’s easy to find the babies clinging to her front.

The twins, both males, are still very small and to call them visually “identical” would be an understatement.  The tiny boys are equally and unequivocally cute as they curiously peek out at their surroundings.  Zoo guests can visit the boys in Central Zoo near the pony rides.

UPDATE 6/25/15:  Zoo keepers named the lemur babies Apollo (meaning sun or light) and Zeus (meaning sky).

Click on the photos to enlarge:

 

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.

 

Baby giraffe|fort wayne children's zoo

It’s A Boy!

A six-foot-tall baby has arrived at the zoo:  A male baby giraffe was born on June 14!  Baby and mom are bonding behind-the-scenes in the giraffe barn.

Female giraffe Zahra delivered the baby, her first, around 5:00 PM Sunday in the giraffe barn, according to African Journey Area Manager Amber Eagleson.  “It was a textbook delivery,” says Eagleson. “The whole delivery took about two hours.”

The baby’s father is Ezeji.  Both Ezeji and Zahra are five years old.

Giraffes give birth standing up, and the baby falls feet-first to the ground.  Keepers had bedded Zahra’s stall with a thick layer of wood shavings to cushion the baby’s landing.  Immediately after the birth, Zahra began licking the calf to clean him.

“Within an hour of birth, the calf stood up and was walking, although he was a bit wobbly,” says Eagleson.  “He began nursing shortly afterward.”  These survival instincts are a great advantage to baby giraffes born in the wild, who can be targeted by predators.

The calf has not yet been named.  He will remain in the barn with Zahra for several weeks, while he gains strength and gets acquainted with the five other members of the zoo’s giraffe herd.  “Our other adult females, including the calf’s grandmother Zuri, are extremely interested in the calf,” says Eagleson.  “They were licking and sniffing him through the wire walls of the stall.”

The new calf is the 23rd giraffe born at the zoo since 1976.

Watch the zoo’s social media accounts for updates on the calf, including an announcement on when he will debut in the giraffe exhibit.

UPDATE 6/17/15:  Video of calf’s first vet exam (one day old).

UPDATE 6/19/15:  Zoo keepers named the new giraffe baby Kiango, which means “light” or “sunshine” in Swahili.

Click on the photos to enlarge:

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.

 

All Grown Up

Every zoo animal has a unique story and a journey all their own.  Some animals come to the Fort Wayne Children’s zoo as adults and some are born here and move on to new adventures at other zoos.  The lemur and wildebeest babies born at the zoo in 2014 fall into a different category.  They’re growing up right here in Fort Wayne and zoo guests get to see it all!

Back in September one of the zoo’s ring-tailed lemurs, Kyna, gave birth to a healthy baby girl.  Zoo keepers named her “Madi” and guests had a chance to see mom and baby on exhibit for a few weeks before the close of the 2014 season.  Madi has grown quite a bit and is almost as big as the other three lemurs in her troop.  Zoo keeper Helena Lacey explains lemur behavior, “Madi would stay with her family in the wild, so she stays with them at the zoo.  She’s weaned now and eats the same diet as the adults.”  Lacey has also begun training Madi using operant conditioning.  Zoo keepers train animals on behaviors such as moving indoors when it gets cold out and standing on a scale for monthly weight checkups.

Lacey stated that while there is no plan to relocate Madi to another zoo, it is always a possibility, “Lemurs are a managed species, so it’s always a possibility that she may have to go to another zoo.  If she did go, mom would likely go with her.”  (Ring-tailed lemurs are managed by the Association of Zoos & Aquarium’s Species Survival Plan.)

Over in the zoo’s African Journey lives a juvenile wildebeest named Sangria.  She was born the morning of July 9, 2014 to the delight of many guests who were lucky enough to be near the savannah that day – Surprise!  (Zoo keepers weren’t expecting the baby for another week.)  Sangria is nearly a year old now and African Journey Area Manager Amber Eagleson doesn’t anticipate her leaving any time soon.

Eagleson discusses the wildebeest breeding program, “We’re trying to build and sustain our own wildebeest population.  We have a new male coming this year who’s not related to any of our females.”  Genetic diversity is important in zoos and the new male could potentially breed with all three of the zoo’s females.

Could there be another baby boom on the African Journey savannah in 2016?  Time will tell…

Click on the photos to enlarge:

Animal babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.

Goat close up with watermark|fort wayne children's zoo

9 Tips For Making the Most of Your Zoo Visit (Goats are #7)

No summer vacation is complete without a trip to the zoo!  Here are nine tips for making the most of your zoo visit:

#1 – Catch a FREE sea lion show.  They happen at Sea Lion Beach every day at 11AM and 3PM.

#2 – Buy a ride pass.  You’ll get 12 rides for the price of 10…and don’t worry if you don’t use all 12 in one day.  Ride passes never expire!

#3 – Visit our newest babies.  Asmara the baby Sumatran orangutan lives in the zoo’s Indonesian Rain Forest and there’s a new colobus monkey baby in the African Journey.  Our kangaroo mob has a new joey that just started venturing out of the pouch.

#4 – Feed a giraffe.  You can buy a piece of lettuce at the giraffe platform for 1 token ($1).  One of our friendly giraffes might come up and eat it right out of your hand!

#5 – Turn your zoo trip into a learning experience.  Visit the For Educators page on our website for ideas and resources.

#6 – Chat with a volunteer.  Our amazing volunteers love talking with guests and sharing their passion for animals and education.  Zoo volunteers are easy to spot – they wear bright red shirts with the zoo logo.

#7 – Make a friend at the Indiana Family Farm.  You’re allowed to pet many of the animals in the barn, including goats, sheep, and donkeys.  Ask a zoo keeper or volunteer for help if you’re not sure how to approach an animal.  They’re there to help.

#8 – Try some new fare.  You’ll find lots of new menu items at our remodeled concession stands.

#9 – Share your memories.  Post your pictures to our Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter feeds.  Your photo could be featured on the front page at kidszoo.org!

colobus monkey baby

Surprise New Baby at the Zoo

Zoo keeper Jess Brinneman found a delightful surprise when she arrived at work on April 22 (Earth Day).  Jibini the colobus monkey had just given birth!

Brinneman describes that morning, “I walked into the monkey building and found Jibini holding her new baby.  It was a big surprise.  It appeared as though she had just given birth.  I called our area manager and she notified our animal curator and vet staff.  We had been observing her for signs of pregnancy but hadn’t confirmed anything yet.”

Zoo staff suspected that Jibini could be pregnant and had been monitoring her for weight gain but hadn’t observed anything significant.  They did, however, notice a couple of diet changes that may have been pregnancy-related.  “She has been eating more kale than usual for the past two months,” states Brinneman, “and I noticed that for the first time she preferred peanuts over grapes, but we didn’t observe any clear signs of pregnancy prior to her delivery.”

The baby, a female, is Jibini’s third offspring.  Jibini’s other daughter and son, Kaasidy and Obi, were born at the zoo and live with Jibini and adult male colobus Finnigan.  Zoo keepers were aware of Jibini’s two previous pregnancies prior to delivery.

Jibini is nursing and caring for her infant, allowing zoo keepers to take a hands-off approach.  All of the colobus monkeys, including the new baby, will go out onto exhibit together soon – possibly as early as next week.

Click on the photos to enlarge:

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.

joey in kangaroo pouch

Our Hoppy Mob has a New ‘Roo

Our kangaroo mob just got a little bigger.  A new joey was born late last year and began venturing out just in time for the 2015 zoo season.

Kangaroos are marsupials with an average gestation period of only 34 days.  Babies are very small when born (about the size of a jelly bean) and still have a lot of developing to do before they can safely move about on their own.  On their first day of life they crawl across their mother’s fur and into the pouch.  This fragile moment is rarely observed and although the newest joey was born some time last year he hadn’t been observed outside of the pouch until recently.

Joeys often hop into their mothers’ pouches head-first, and may wait awhile before they somersault upright.  Because of this, guests are likely to observe the baby’s feet sticking straight up out of the pouch!

Zoo guests can visit the kangaroo mob in the New Australian Adventure.  Mom and joey are usually out on exhibit and zoo staff and volunteers are often available for question and answer sessions.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.

Click on the photos to enlarge.

orangutans fort wayne zoo

First Photos! – Baby Asmara Explores Her Exhibit

Asmara, a 16-week old Sumatran orangutan at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo, went into Orangutan Valley for the first time last week. Until now, Asmara and her mother, Tara, have been living in an off-exhibit bedroom adjacent to the main exhibit.

On their first day in the exhibit, Asmara clung tightly to her mother as Tara explored high up in the trees.  Zoo keeper Angie Selzer watched nervously, buy all went well. “Tara climbed very high right away, but Asmara clung tightly just like she would in the wild,” she said.

Prior to the big day, the exhibit underwent extensive baby-proofing.  Zoo keepers covered the floor with soft straw and checked the trees, walls, and vines for potential safety issues.  The City of Fort Wayne’s tree crews even got involved, helping to reinforce the vines and hammocks.

Will you get to see Tara and Asmara when the zoo opens on April 25?  Zoo keepers are working toward that goal. Indonesian Rain Forest area manager Tanisha Dunbar explained, “The goal is to mix all four of our orangutans behind-the-scenes, and once they’re comfortable, we’ll let them all go out on exhibit together,” said Dunbar.  “And they always have a choice.  They can choose whether or not to go out each morning, although Tara’s never been one to stay behind-the-scenes.”

Born on November 22 to Tara and her mate, Tengku, Asmara is important to the future of Sumatran orangutans, which are Critically Endangered.  About 320 Sumatran orangutans live in zoos worldwide, and an average of 15 babies are born each year in the world’s zoos. In the wild, these red-furred apes are found only on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, where the population is in drastic decline due to illegal hunting and the destruction of their forest homes to build palm oil plantations.

Fewer than 7,000 Sumatran orangutans remain in the wild. Some experts predict orangutans could become extinct in the wild within a few decades if circumstances remain unchanged.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Hello, Goodbye: Red Panda Update

Big changes are happening at the red panda exhibit.  We’re saying goodbye to two old friends, hello to a new one, and maybe preparing for a new arrival.

Zoo fans got to know Maliha the red panda cub in 2014.  Maliha was born to mother Xiao and father Junji on June 9.  A team of zoo keepers and veterinarian staff monitored the little cub closely for the first few months, while the path to her exhibit remained closed in an effort to minimize disturbances.  Near the end of the 2014 season, Maliha did venture out into her exhibit and zoo guests had a chance to meet her before we closed in October.

Zoo staff is happy to report that Maliha is still thriving and that the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo has received a new breeding recommendation for Xiao!

The breeding of red pandas is overseen by the Species Survival Plan (SSP), a program of the Association of Zoos & Aquariums.  The goal of the SSP is to maximize genetic diversity in zoo-dwelling populations of endangered and threatened animals.

What does all of this mean for the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo?  First, it means that a new male red panda has come to Fort Wayne.  His name is Mars and he’s currently getting acquainted with his new mate, Xiao.  Happy Valentine’s Day!

Second, male red panda Junji has been called to relocate to Mesker Park Zoo & Botanic Garden in Evansville.  There is a breeding recommendation in place for Junji and his new mate, Celeste.

Finally, the SSP has recommended relocation for Maliha, which will likely occur in early April, 2015.  Maliha’s new home will be Potter Park Zoo in Lansing Michigan. Red pandas reach sexual maturity at approximately 1 year, 7 months of age, which means Maliha will not be ready to breed until 2016.

In the meantime, Maliha will continue living at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo with her mom Xiao and new friend Mars.  Mars met both females on February 3 and the introductions have gone smoothly.

With all going according to plan, can zoo fans expect panda babies in 2015?  Probably not, but it’s not out of the question.  Area manager Shelly Scherer explains, “Red panda breeding season is January through February.  We are not too optimistic that we will have cubs this summer; however since their breeding season does run until the end of February, there still is a chance.”

Red pandas are native to the forested foothills of the Himalaya Mountains in China and Nepal, where they feed primarily on bamboo.  They are classified as “Vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Though red pandas share a name with the famed black-and-white giant pandas, the two are not closely related.  The name “panda” comes from the Nepalese word ponya, which means “bamboo-eater.”

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Credit to zoo keeper Helena Lacey for Mars photo.

baby orangutan fort wayne childrens zoo

Baby Orangutan Turns Two Months Old

Baby Asmara turns 2 months old this week!  The critically endangered Sumatran orangutan was born at the zoo on November 22.  Her parents are Tara and Tengku, two of the zoo’s adult orangutans.  Asmara and mom Tara are doing well behind-the-scenes and zoo fans frequently send us questions via social media about the baby.

Angie Selzer is a zoo keeper who cares for the orangutans.  She was present during Tara’s labor and witnessed the delivery of Asmara.  Selzer explains the day-to-day life of Asmara, “She spends all of her time with her mom.  Most of the time she’s nursing or sleeping in her nest.  She grips onto her mom well.”

Developing a strong grip is important for orangutans.  As Asmara grows she’ll begin climbing and swinging from tree to tree.  Selzer reports that Asmara’s development is progressing normally and that Tara is gradually introducing some early independence into her baby’s routine, “Tara is doing a really good job.  She gives Asmara tummy time and has been showing Asmara how to grip onto things other than just mom.”

Dr. Joe Smith is the zoo’s veterinarian.  He explains why the vet staff and keepers have chosen to limit behind-the-scenes access to media and even to most zoo staff, “Orangutan infants have a naïve immune system, just like human babies do, and they can contract many of the same diseases that we humans can carry.  Plus, we’re right in the middle of flu season so we’re choosing to be cautious.”

Dr. Smith stated that baby Asmara’s development is going well and that her vet staff and keepers do not have any medical concerns at this time.

About 320 Sumatran orangutans live in zoos worldwide, and an average of 15 babies are born each year in the world’s zoos. In the wild, these red-furred apes are found only on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, where the population is in drastic decline due to illegal hunting and the destruction of their forest homes to build palm oil plantations. Fewer than 7,000 Sumatran orangutans remain in the wild. Some experts predict orangutans could become extinct in the wild within a few decades if circumstances remain unchanged.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge: