Archive for African Animals

This Baby is 20 Minutes Old!

baby wildebeest

Zoo guests got a wonderful surprise this morning when a wildebeest gave birth in the African savannah at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo.  Zoo keepers noticed that the mother was in labor at approximately 9:38AM and she delivered a calf at 10:08AM this morning.  The calf stood and began walking within minutes.  It also began nursing shortly after birth.  These photos were taken when the baby was just 20 minutes old!

Several zoo guests were fortunate to observe the birth, since it occurred during zoo hours.  Zoo keepers and vet staff were aware of the pregnancy, but could not pinpoint a due date.  The calf’s gender has not yet been determined.

For now, the zebras are staying in the barn while the new baby adjusts to life on the pasture.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Posted in: African Animals, Baby Animals

How Zoo Keepers Fixed a “Smelly” Problem

mongoose zoo attraction

The Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo has come up with an unusual fix for a “smelly” problem.  It all started when one of the zoo’s banded mongooses had his medical checkup.  Upon his return, zoo keepers noticed that the troop was reluctant to allow him back in.  He was the same old mongoose, ready to join his troop, but he smelled different.  That was a big problem, because mongooses recognize each other by their scent.  His troop refused to socialize with this now strange-smelling mongoose or share their space with him.  Some of the others even became aggressive despite his clean bill of health.  What’s a mongoose to do!?!

Zoo keeper Nancee Hutchinson found a unique solution to the problem. “We bring them indoors and spray Vicks Vap-O-Rub on the floor.  The whole troop comes running and rolls all around in it.  Then they all smell the same, even the one who spent some time away.” 

When a troop of mongooses rolls around in a smell it’s called “scent marking”.  It’s common in the wild and ensures that all troop members smell the same.  Hutchinson became interested in using Vicks Vap-O-Rub with the mongooses after she learned that a zoo in Europe had used a similar technique with meerkats.  “When we spray Vicks inside the mongoose enclosure, the mongooses respond by scent-marking.  They all roll around in the Vicks.  This overrides any old smells that might have caused them to reject a member.”

This fall, Hutchinson will share what she learned at the American Association of Zoo Keepers national conference.   

Click on the photos to enlarge:

Posted in: African Animals, Zoo News

Picky Eaters? We’ve Got Them, Too!

Bill 100X100

Bill the lion may have a big appetite, but that doesn’t mean he’ll eat anything!  According to African Journey Area Director Amber Eagleson,  Bill’s reluctance to accept dietary change lead to his reputation as a “picky eater”.  

“All our big cats eat a commercial ground-meat diet we purchase by the ton.  Whenever we switch meat companies, Bill is always the last to comply.  We find it ironic since he eats the largest amount of meat in the entire zoo!” states Eagleson.  

Fortunately for Bill, who consumes approximately eight pounds of meat each day, the zoo changes animal diets only a supplier cannot meet the necessary nutritional requirements.  To ease the transition to a new diet, Eagleson explains that “For most carnivores, we will mix 75% of the meat they are accustomed to with 25% of the new meat for a week and then go to 50:50 and then 25:75.  Almost always, it is no big deal for the animal.  However, Bill has given us problems almost every time.”  

What’s a zoo keeper to do?  In the case of Bill “The Picky Eater” Lion, the transition starts at 95% new to 5% old and proceeds gradually from there.

In the Indonesian Rain Forest, the term “picky eating” takes on a different definition.  Melati, Tengku, and Tara, the zoo’s Sumatran orangutans, approach their lunch very carefully.   They reach inside of pumpkins and carefully pluck out seeds one at a time.   The orangutans then shell and eat each pumpkin seed until the last one is gone.  According to Tanisha Dunbar, Area Director for the Indonesian Rainforest, Melati approaches the task so precisely that she finishes every last seed “without breaking a single one.”  

Dunbar also points out that, “Melati can peel grapes without breaking them.”  How’s that for “picky eating”?

Posted in: African Animals, Enrichment, Indonesian Rain Forest, Zoo News

Where Do the Animals Go in the Winter?

IndoBird 100X100

At the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo, we often hear the question, “Where do the animals go in the winter?”  The answer is – They stay right here!  The zoo is quieter since we closed for the season on October 13, but our animals and zoo keepers haven’t gone anywhere.  Some animals spend the winter outdoors, some indoors, and many have the opportunity to do both.  Here’s a list of where a few of our animals spend their fall and winter “vacation”:

 Outdoors             Indoors                    Both                       
  • North American River Otters
  • Indonesian Rain Forest Birds
  • African Journey Birds
  • Sea Lions
  • Fruit Bats
  • Primates
  • Red Pandas
  • Echnidas
  • Lions

Why do some of the animals stay in while others go out?  According to African Journey Area Manager Amber Eagleson, it all depends on something called “access temperature”.  The access temperature is the threshold that’s safe for a particular species.  “Zoo keepers monitor the outdoor temperature to determine whether an animal can go outside”, states Eagleson.  Access temperature varies considerably, even for animals from the same geographic region.   For example, giraffes have an access temperature of 45 degrees.  African birds can endure much lower temperatures.  Eagleson states that “Ostriches have an access temp of zero degrees and for storks it’s five to ten degrees.”

The animals of the Indonesian Rain Forest also have a diverse range of access temperatures.  According to Area Manager Tanisha Dunbar, primates venture outdoors as long as temperatures are above 40 degrees.  The 40-degree threshold also applies to tigers.  Says Dunbar, “Some of the animals have continuous access to the outdoors, and some go out on exhibit if the weather allows it.”  The birds of the rain forest, however, spend the off-season inside the rain forest dome.

So although the zoo is closed for the season, the animals are still here…with the exception of one group.  The horses and ponies spend the winter off-site at a family farm.

The animals of the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo will all be here and ready for opening day on April 26.  Will you join us?

Posted in: African Animals, Birds, Indonesian Rain Forest, Zoo News

Beautiful Birds of Prey

Eurasian eagle owl 107x107px

Some of our most fascinating birds are a diverse group of feathered predators known as “birds of prey.”  Owls, vultures, and hawks are part of this group. 

These birds share some key features:  sharp talons, a strong, hooked beak, and excellent eyesight.  Some, like owls, can capture a mouse in complete darkness.  Vultures can smell a dead animal from up to a mile away!

As top predators in their ecosystems, birds of prey face unique conservation challenges.  The Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo supports the conservation efforts of the Peregrine Fund in Tanzania as they work to protect these amazing animals. 

Meet the birds of prey exhibited at the zoo:

Ruppell's Griffon Vulture

Ruppell’s Griffon Vulture

Eurasian eagle owl

Eurasian Eagle Owl

Names:  Igor, Wednesday, Morticia, & Gomez
Location:  African Journey
Look for these birds on the deadfall perches on the
savannah. Learn more

Names:  Gypsy & Seeker
Location:  Central Zoo
Seeker, the female, is the larger of the two birds.
Learn more

 
Verreaux's Eagle Owl

Verreaux’s Eagle Owl

 
Turkey Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Name:  Roosevelt
Location:  African Journey
These birds are also known as Milky Eagle Owls.

Name:  Vincent
Location:  Central Zoo
Vincent was struck by a car and brought to the zoo. 
He cannot be released because he has an eye injury.

 
Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

 
Barn Owl

Barn Owl

Name:  Maverick
Location:  Central Zoo
Red-tailed hawks are common in our area.  Look
for them on fence posts as you drive on the highway.

Name:  Lindbergh
Location:  Indiana Family Farm
Peek through the wooden barrier in the Big
Red Barn to get a look at this nocturnal bird. 
Learn more

 

 

Posted in: African Animals, Birds

How to Train a Crane

Wattled crane 107x107px

For sheer beauty and elegance, few zoo birds rival the wattled cranes in the African Journey.  You’d never guess that these seemingly peaceful birds have an aggressive streak.

“They will jab at you with their beak,” says Amber Eagleson, who manages the African Journey.  “And there is some serious power in those legs – they will kick right at you.” 

Wattled cranes stand four to five feet tall and are native to wetlands throughout sub-Saharan Africa.  Our birds, Betty and Hannibal, are an established pair who produced their first clutch of eggs last year.  Unfortunately, both eggs were crushed, probably by the cranes themselves as they moved around in their nest – not uncommon in first-time parents.

Because of the potential for injury, zoo keepers always work in pairs when entering the cranes’ marshy enclosure, which sits along the boardwalk near the African Journey’s exit.  They also wear goggles for eye protection, and carry a broom to fend off the birds if they get aggressive. 

Another tool used to manage the cranes is training.  “The cranes are trained to station on a target,” like a colored board on a stick, Eagleson explains.  “By rewarding them when they touch their beak to the target, we can move them to a different area of the exhibit.”  This allows keepers to keep the cranes’ attention when crews are performing maintenance in the exhibit, for example.  “It also allows us to see the birds up close and inspect their body condition,” Eagleson says.  The cranes are rewarded for their participation with pinky mice. 

Wattled crane populations are shrinking in Africa, due to destruction and alteration of wetlands.

Click on the photos below to view them full screen.

Viewing Tip:

Betty and Hannibal reinforce their pair bond with unison calls – loud, shrill honks that are made with heads tilted back.  They also perform an elaborate mating dance, jumping up and down with wings flapping while moving back and forth.  “I see this nearly every day,” Eagleson says.  Also, watch for nest-building activity this fall – eggs are usually laid in late August or early September in a huge grassy nest.

Posted in: African Animals, Birds, Conservation

Perfect Plumage for a Penguin

penguin

If you’re a penguin, your feathers are super-important:  they keep you warm in chilly waters, they keep your skin dry, and provide you with a snappy tuxedo-like outfit. 

But once a year, it all falls apart – literally.  During a one-to two-week period each year, all of a penguin’s feathers fall out.  This process is called molting, and it causes dramatic changes in the zoo’s African black-footed penguin flock.

“Each of our 17 penguins molts on a different schedule,” says zoo keeper Kasey DeLucenay.  “There is almost always someone in the process.”

Molting begins with each penguin increasing its weight by about 50% in just a few weeks.  “A bird that weighs five pounds might gain more than two pounds,” DeLucenay says.  The weight gain helps a penguin get through the molt – a time when it can’t swim and hunt for fish – without eating. 

During the molt, the penguins look scruffy, with patches of fluffy feathers popping up in random spots.  “The molt seems to start at the tail and work its way up the body,” DeLucenay says.

Eventually, the old plumage is replaced by a sleek new set of feather.  In juveniles, the brown feathers are replaced by the black-and-white plumage of the adults.  As a finishing touch, the penguins preen each feather by rubbing it with waterproofing oil, which is taken from a gland at the base of the tail.

Read more about penguins here.

You can help feed the penguins at a VIP Experience.

Click the photos below to enlarge.

Posted in: African Animals, Birds, Penguins

How to Make a Lion Eat His Dinner

Africa Lion Featured Image

Bill the lion needs no introduction.  His laid-back attitude and stunning physique make him a crowd favorite.  Thanks to his penchant for resting on the exhibit window, he’s in thousands of family photos.  Could he be any more of a superstar?

“I think Bill just enjoys being awesome,” says zoo keeper Jennifer McDermott. 

Bill was only two years old with a scruffy little mane when he debuted at the African Journey’s grand opening in 2009.  As he prepares to celebrate his 7th birthday on July 22, he has matured into a beautiful 435-pound adult male lion.

But amid all the hype, Bill has a few bad habits.  According to McDermott, “Bill is the pickiest eater I’ve ever seen.”

Because lions eat only one thing – meat – this can be a problem.  The zoo buys a frozen prepared meat diet (similar to a tube of ground beef) by the ton.  When a new batch of meat arrives, keepers know that Bill will snub his finicky nose at it, at least for the first few days.

“He makes what I call a ‘yuck’ face, like a little kid,” says McDermott.  “He’ll scrunch up his eyes, stick out his tongue, and walk away from his food.”  In lion-speak, this apparently means “I don’t wanna eat this, and you can’t make me!”

McDermott doesn’t worry about Bill’s diva-like attitude regarding his dinner.  “He eventually eats it,” she says. 

Unlike Bill, Ina the lioness is very interested in her food.  When McDermott calls the cats to dinner at the end of the day, Ina makes a beeline for the meat placed in their night quarters.  Bill, on the other hand, takes his sweet time.  “We just wait him out,” says McDermott.  When he does decide to come inside, “He walks very slowly,” she says. 

Bad habits aside, McDermott is in awe of Bill.  “I love looking into his eyes,” she says.  “He’s just beautiful.”

Read more about lions here.

You can help feed the lions at a VIP Experience.

Click the photos below to enlarge.

Posted in: African Animals, Lions

Meet Kaasidy, Our Little Daredevil

baby colobus monkey

How many ways can a 9-month-old monkey worry her keepers?  Kaasidy the baby colobus monkey is trying to find out.

“She’s quite the daredevil ,” said African Journey Area Manger Amber Eagleson of Kaasidy.  Eagelson describes Kaasidy’s first day in the new colobus monkey exhibit, when the little monkey climbed to the top of the exhibit, let go, and dropped ten feet to a low branch.  “My heart stopped for just a second,” says Eagleson.  But Kaasidy had no worries – she climbed to the top and did it all over again.

One of Kaasidy’s favorite antics is to hang from the long bushy tails of her mother, Jibini, and Wamblenica, another female.  “They don’t seem to mind at all,” said Eagleson.  But dad’s tail is off-limits.  “We never see her hanging from Finnigan’s tail – he’s not as tolerant as the females.”

Kaasidy was born on September 25, so she was on exhibit for only a few days before the zoo closed for the season.  The colobus family moved back outdoors after their exhibit in the African Journey was completely rebuilt and enlarged this spring.  Colobus monkeys are native to the forests of central and eastern Africa. 

Eagleson encourages you to spend time at the colobus exhibit and watch Kaasidy at play.  “She only rests for a few minutes,” Eagleson said.  “Then she’s back at it again.”

Read more about colobus monkeys.

Click the photos below to enlarge.

Posted in: African Animals, Baby Animals, Monkeys

Zebras with Spots?

zebra face

As she prepares to feed the zebras on the 3-acre African Journey savannah, zoo keeper Lisa Gehlhausen gathers her equipment.  Wheelbarrow:  check.   Zebra treats:  check.  Stick to fend off ostrich:  check. Treats for ostrich:  check.  Wait a minute – are we feeding the ostrich or the zebras?

“You really can’t feed one without the other,” she says.  “The ostrich follow us everywhere.”

Indeed, Kimmy and Penny, the zoo’s two female ostriches, are ever-present as Gehlhausen tosses chunks of carrot and sweet potato to the zebras.  “We use these treats to encourage the zebras to go into the barn at night,” she explains.  “That helps reduce wear and tear on the pasture.”  The zebras also eat hay and grain, and nibble on real grass on the pasture.

A bucket of cracked corn distracts the ostriches while Gehlhausen explains how she tells the zoo’s three female zebras apart.  “Each zebra has different markings,” she says.  “The trick is to look at the things that aren’t stripes.”  Telodi, for example, has one white spot on the left side of her lower neck, while Jasiri has two white spots in the center of her neck, as if she is wearing a necklace.  Okolo has a black spot on her left shoulder.

As herd animals, Telodi, Jasiri, and Okolo are never far from each other.  And if there’s food involved, the ostriches are guaranteed to be in the vicinity.

Click on the photos below to enlarge.

Posted in: African Animals, Zebras, Zoo News