Archive for Baby Animals

7 FAQs about our Baby Orangutan Answered

Baby orangutan, 2 weeks

Tara, a Sumatran orangutan at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo, delivered a healthy baby girl on November 22.  Zoo staff named the baby Asmara, which means “love,” and she is the first Sumatran orangutan born at any zoo in the United States in 2014.  Asmara represents a significant addition to the population of critically endangered Sumatran orangutans, and the zoo has received many questions on Facebook and Twitter about this special little ape.

Here are the answers to 7 Frequently Asked Questions about baby Asmara:

Q:  When can people see the baby?
A:  Mom Tara and baby Asmara are getting to know one another and only limited zoo staff are permitted to see them.  This is to allow quiet bonding time for the pair.  We expect that Tara and Asmara will be out on exhibit when the zoo reopens on April 25.

Q:  Will the new baby stay in Fort Wayne?
A:  Sumatran orangutans are critically endangered.  The Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo participates in the Species Survival Program managed by the AZA. As such, we work with the program to ensure genetic diversity in zoos and sometimes animals are called to live elsewhere. While we don’t know all that the future will hold, we do know that orangutans mature slowly and Tara’s baby will require maternal care for the next 6-8 years.

Q:  Where are Asmara and Tara right now?
A:  They’re currently living in the orangutan bedrooms, which are adjacent to the orangutan exhibit.  They share a bedroom separate from the other orangutans.

Q:  Do the zoo keepers get to hold and feed the baby?
A:  Zoo keepers have not fed Asmara, nor have they handled her.  Tara is doing everything she should to care for her baby, including nursing.

Q:  Who delivered Asmara?
A:  Zoo keepers observed Tara’s delivery in case of complications but did not assist.  Tara delivered her baby on her own.

Q:  Has Tengku met his baby yet?
A:  Tara has been in a separate bedroom from adult orangutans Tengku (Asmara’s father) and Melati since about a week before giving birth. All the orangutans have had visual and auditory contact the entire time, through labor, delivery and afterwards.  Both Tengku and Melati are interested in the baby.

Q:  Will all the orangutans ever be allowed to share the same space?
A:  Yes, eventually.  When zoo keepers do start introductions, it will be gradual through a mesh barrier first and then physical contact in the behind-the-scenes area.  The current plan will be to introduce Tengku with Tara and Asmara first and then to introduce Melati to the group.

 

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Posted in: Baby Animals, Indonesian Rain Forest, Orangutans, Zoo News

Zoo Names Baby Orangutan

Baby Asmara 10 days 107pxl

A baby Sumatran orangutan born at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo on November 22 has a name – one that reflects how special she is to the zoo and the entire population of these endangered apes. Her name is Asmara, which translates to “love” in Indonesian.

Now 11 days old, Asmara and her mother, 19-year-old Tara, are bonding behind-the-scenes at the zoo’s orangutan exhibit. Asmara is developing normally and Tara is providing excellent maternal care. Like all orangutan infants, Asmara clings to her mother constantly and will continue to do so for the next several months.

As the only Sumatran orangutan to be born in a United States zoo so far in 2014, Asmara represents an important addition to the zoo-dwelling orangutan population.  About 320 Sumatran orangutans live in zoos worldwide, and only about 15 babies are born each year in the world’s zoos.  Fewer than 7,000 Sumatran orangutans remain in the wild forests of Sumatra, Indonesia.

The breeding Tara with 28-year-old Tengku was recommended by the Orangutan Species Survival Plan, a program of the Association of Zoos & Aquariums that seeks to maintain genetic diversity within zoo-dwelling populations of endangered and threatened animals.

Because Asmara is Tara’s first baby and Tara has never observed another female caring for an infant, officials were concerned that she may not know how to care for her baby.   Zoo staff had extensive plans in place should Tara fail to provide care, but so far, none of those measures have been needed.

Zoo fans can watch for baby photos on the zoo’s Facebook and Twitter pages in the coming weeks.  Zoo guests will have their first chance to see the new baby when the zoo opens for the season on April 25.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

 

Posted in: Baby Animals, Indonesian Rain Forest, Orangutans, Zoo News

Baby Orangutan Born at the Zoo

baby orangutan fort wayne zoo

Tara, a Sumatran orangutan at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo, delivered a healthy female baby in the early morning hours of Saturday, November 22.

The baby is the only Sumatran orangutan born in a United States zoo in 2014, so she represents a significant addition to the population of critically endangered Sumatran orangutans.

“We are thrilled with the outcome so far,” said Zoo Animal Curator Mark Weldon. “Tara is doing everything she should to care for her baby.”

Zoo keepers and veterinary staff expected 19-year-old Tara to give birth between mid-November and early December.  They had been watching Tara by remote camera overnight for several weeks.  When keepers observed Tara pacing late Friday in her off-exhibit bedroom, they suspected she was in labor and arrived at the zoo to monitor the birth.  Tara’s labor lasted a few hours, and she delivered her baby unassisted.

Immediately following the delivery, Tara began cleaning her infant and placed it in her nest – a pile of wood wool and blankets – where she sleeps at night.  The baby was first observed nursing Sunday morning.

No name has yet been chosen for the baby.  For now, Tara and the baby are staying in the bedrooms adjacent to the zoo’s orangutan exhibit.

Tara’s pregnancy was announced in October.  Orangutans are pregnant for an average of 245 days, or a little over eight months.  The baby’s father is Tengku, the zoo’s 28-year-old male orangutan, who arrived in Fort Wayne from Zoo Atlanta in 1995.

Zoo officials are cautiously optimistic about the baby’s future.  Because this is Tara’s first baby and she has never observed another female caring for an infant, officials were concerned that she may not know how to care for her baby.

To address any potential issues with the birth, zoo keepers spent the last several months preparing an extensive Birth Management Plan.  Prior to the birth, zoo keepers used a plush stuffed toy and operant conditioning to train Tara to bring her “baby” to keepers who could bottle-feed it if Tara failed to nurse.  Tara has also been trained to present her nipple to keepers to nurse a baby, in the event that keepers must provide daily care for the infant.

“So far, none of these measures has been needed,” said Weldon.  “Tara is proving to be a good mother.”

The breeding of Tara with Tengku was recommended by the Orangutan Species Survival Plan (SSP), a program of the Association of Zoos & Aquariums that seeks to maintain genetic diversity within populations of endangered animals.  Tara arrived in Fort Wayne in 2013 from the Columbus Zoo.  Lori Perkins of Zoo Atlanta chairs the Orangutan SSP, and she says that only eight other orangutans have been born in United States Zoos in 2014, but all are Bornean orangutans – a separate subspecies from the Sumatran orangutans that are held at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo.  Perkins notes that two other Sumatran orangutans are currently pregnant at other US zoos.

Zoo fans can watch for baby photos on the zoo’s Facebook and Twitter pages in the coming weeks. Zoo guests will have their first chance to see the new baby when the zoo opens for the season on April 25.  “Orangutans grow very slowly, so this baby will still be clinging to mom and learning to climb when the zoo opens in the spring,” said Weldon.  Orangutans have the longest childhood of any animal other than humans, and require maternal care until they are six to eight years old.

About 320 Sumatran orangutans live in zoos worldwide, and an average of 15 babies are born each year in the world’s zoos.  In the wild, these red-furred apes are found only on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, where the population is in drastic decline due to illegal hunting and the destruction of their forest homes to build palm oil plantations.  Fewer than 7,000 Sumatran orangutans remain in the wild.  Some experts predict orangutans could become extinct in the wild within a few decades if circumstances remain unchanged.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Posted in: Baby Animals, Conservation, Indonesian Rain Forest, Orangutans, Zoo News

Meet a Cute New Zoo Baby

crocodile skink baby lizard zoo

The zoo’s crocodile skinks have done it again – they had another baby!  The newest member of the family is just 2 weeks old and every bit as cute as its 9-month old sibling.

Zoo keepers observed an egg back in August and began planning for a hatchling.  On November 3 the egg hatched and a healthy baby emerged.  Zoo keeper Dave Messmann offered a report on the lizard, “It was a normal hatchling and seems to be doing very well.  It eats live crickets and it’s getting bigger.”

Messmann held the baby skink to show how small it really is (see photo below.)  Although it’s still tiny, weighing no more than a few grams, the skink will increase in size significantly over the next several months.  Its older sibling has quadrupled in size since birth and the zoo’s adult crocodile skinks weigh approximately one pound each.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Posted in: Baby Animals, Indonesian Rain Forest, Zoo News

Meet Madi the Mini-Me Lemur

Madi the Mini-Me

Madi the ring-tailed lemur is now six weeks old and looks like a mini-me version of her mother.  Born to first-time parents Ombe and Kyna, baby Madi is doing well and growing larger and more independent each day.

“Madi is starting to move off of mom and showing interest in the things around her,” stated zoo keeper Helena Lacey.  “She’s doing great and hitting all the milestones that she should.”

An upcoming milestone is weaning from mother’s milk to solid food.  Lacey says that while zoo keepers haven’t observed Madi eating any solid food, the interest is there.  “We haven’t seen her eat anything yet but she has been reaching for the objects around her, including food.”  Lemurs munch on fruit, leaves, bark, flowers, grass, and tree sap.  The zoo’s lemurs also get corn on the cob as part of their diet.

The zoo announced Madi’s arrival on October 1.  Madi has already attracted national attention as a featured ZooBorns animal.

Madi is short for Madagascar, the home of endangered ring-tailed lemurs in the wild.

Click on the photos to enlarge:

Posted in: Baby Animals, Central Zoo, Zoo News

Tara the Orangutan is Pregnant

Fort Wayne Children's Zoo orangutan

Tara, a Sumatran orangutan at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo, is expecting a baby this fall. This is the first pregnancy for 19-year-old Tara, and the baby would be the second orangutan ever born at the zoo.

“We’re excited about Tara’s pregnancy and the chance to add to the population of this critically endangered species,” says Zoo Animal Curator Mark Weldon.

The baby is due sometime from mid-November to early December.  The father is Tengku, the zoo’s 28-year-old male orangutan, who arrived in Fort Wayne from Zoo Atlanta in 1995.  Orangutans are pregnant for an average of 245 days, or a little over eight months.

Tara came to the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo in April 2013 from the Columbus Zoo in Ohio and was introduced to Tengku and Melati, a 29-year-old female orangutan, about a month after arriving.  Zoo keepers regularly monitor Tara’s hormonal cycles and after changes were noted in her cycle this spring, zoo keepers used a human pregnancy test kit to confirm the pregnancy. (Certain brands of over-the-counter tests are known to react accurately with orangutan hormones.)

The breeding of Tara with Tengku was recommended by the Species Survival Plan (SSP), a program of the Association of Zoos & Aquariums that seeks to maintain genetic diversity within populations of endangered animals.  About 320 Sumatran orangutans live in zoos worldwide, and only about 15 babies are born each year in the world’s zoos.  These red-furred apes are found only on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, where the population is in drastic decline due to illegal hunting and the destruction of their forest homes to build palm oil plantations.

At age 19, “Tara is the perfect age for breeding,” says Zoo Keeper Angie Selzer, who cares for the orangutans.   However, Tara has never given birth, nor has she lived with another female who has delivered a baby. As a result, Tara may not know how to raise an infant.  “Orangutans learn by watching others,” says Weldon.  “If Tara’s never observed maternal behavior, she may not know how to take care of a baby.”

To address any potential issues with the birth, zoo keepers have prepared an extensive Birth Management Plan.  Using a plush stuffed toy and operant conditioning, Tara has been trained to bring her “baby” to keepers who will bottle-feed it if Tara fails to nurse.  Tara has also been trained to present her nipple to keepers to nurse her baby, in the event that keepers must provide daily care for the infant.

In 2006, female orangutan Sayang delivered the first orangutan ever born at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo.  Just one hour after giving birth to a healthy male infant, Sayang collapsed and died unexpectedly from a blood clot in her lungs.

The baby, named Dumadi, was cared for around the clock by zoo keepers until he was eight months old.  He moved to Zoo Atlanta in 2007, where he was fostered by Madu, an experienced mother, and integrated in to the zoo’s orangutan group.  Orangutans have the longest childhood of any animal other than humans, and require maternal care until they are six to eight years old.

 

Posted in: Baby Animals, Indonesian Rain Forest, Orangutans

Zoo Baby Announcement!

lemur baby zoo

It’s a girl!  Madi the ring-tailed lemur was born to mother Kyna and father Ombe on September 22.  The baby is doing well and will be on exhibit for the rest of the season, weather permitting.

You may think most animal babies are born in the spring, but lemurs are typically born in the fall.  Their breeding season occurs in April and gestation lasts 4-5 months.  Ring-tailed lemurs are born with lots of hair and with eyes wide open. At first, the baby clings to its mother’s chest, but later it will ride on her back.  The young are independent after six months.

You can help support the care of Madi and other zoo animals by adopting a lemur.

Madi is short for “Madagascar,” the home of ring-tailed lemurs in the wild.  Less than 10% of Madagascar’s forest cover remains and due to this drastic loss of habitat, ring-tailed lemurs are an endangered species.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Posted in: Baby Animals, Central Zoo, Lemurs, Zoo News

Panda Cub’s Baby Book

Maliha in bowl 107 pxl

Maliha the red panda is 14 weeks old now and spends a lot of time outside of her nest, but it wasn’t long ago that zoo guests wondered if they’d ever get a look at the adorable cub.  As expected, it took about three months for Maliha to venture outside on her own and begin exploring her surroundings (video and photos below).

 

International Red Panda Day is this Saturday, and Zoo staff put together a Baby Book to commemorate the endangered cub’s first three months of life.   Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.

Click on the photos to enlarge:

Posted in: Baby Animals, Central Zoo, Red Panda, Zoo News

This Animal Has 50 Babies at a Time!

Mantid 104pxl

If you have trouble keeping track of your kids, imagine having 50 of them at once!  That’s how many offspring the dead-leaf mantids in the Indonesian Rain Forest produce in a single batch.  These big bugs are a type of praying mantis perfectly camouflaged to look like dead leaves.

Zoo keepers are working on breeding a self-sustaining population of this species, so the 50 tiny mantids were a welcome addition.

Zoo keeper Dave Messmann explains why it’s important for the zoo to breed and support its own population of dead-leaf mantids, as opposed to relying on outside sources.  “We want to sustain our population so we don’t have to have new insects shipped to us,” he said.  “If one of our populations crashes, there is no guarantee that another zoo is still exhibiting this species. Even if they do have some, they may not have any surplus animals to send us.”

Dead-leaf mantids can reproduce in two ways.  One is fertilization, when a male mantid approaches a female in the traditional mating ritual, resulting in fertilized eggs.  As with other praying mantis species, the female is larger than the male and may become aggressive shortly after mating.  Females can also reproduce via the asexual method of parthenogenesis.  This happens when the female lays unfertilized eggs that hatch into viable young.  Parthenogenesis typically results in female offspring since there is no genetic component from a male without fertilization.

mantid fort wayne zooWhether fertilization or parthenogenesis occurs, the next step is the same:  the female produces an egg case called an “ootheca” (see photo on left) in which eggs are deposited.  In the case of fertilization, the female makes the ootheca 4-6 weeks after mating.  The material for the ootheca is excreted from her abdomen like a ribbon and formed into a case that will protect her eggs.  She adheres the ootheca to the wall of the aquarium she lives in.

The zoo currently has one adult male mantid and keepers believe that the 50 new babies resulted from fertilized eggs.

Babies emerge from the ootheca after five weeks and look like miniature adults.  They go through six instars (phases) before reaching full maturity.  The young, or “nymphs”, double in size during each instar, then shed their skin before doubling in size again.  The six instar phases take about 3-4 months.  Dead-leaf mantids live about one year.

Dead-leaf mantids eat pinhead crickets and certain types of vegetation but will sometimes prey on each other.  They are native to Southeast Asia.

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Posted in: Baby Animals, Indonesian Rain Forest, Insects

Red Panda Cub Gets a Name

baby red panda cub fort wayne

She’s strong and she’s beautiful, and now the zoo’s six-week-old red panda cub has a name to match.  Zoo keepers have bestowed the name “Maliha” on the little female cub – a name that means “strong and beautiful” in a Nepalese language.

Zoo Keeper Helena Lacey, who works with the red pandas daily, chose the cub’s name to reflect her wild heritage – red pandas are native to Nepal and China – and to fit the cub’s personality.  “I also wanted her name to reflect the whole journey we’ve been on with our red pandas for the last three years,” she said.  “Plus, she is a very strong cub, and beautiful too!”

Maliha still spends all her time in an air-conditioned nest box with her mother, five-year-old Xiao, but is gradually becoming more active, Lacey says. “Maliha rolls around, plays with her feet, and stays awake more,” she says.  “She tries to walk, but her feet still slide out from under her.”

Red panda cubs typically remain in the nest box for about three months. This means that zoo guests have little chance of seeing the cub until late August or early September.  Zoo keepers monitor Xiao and Maliha via a remote camera mounted in the nest box. This video shows Maliha as she discovers her paws:

Though Maliha is thriving, she still faces other hurdles. “Weaning is a critical time for red panda cubs as they make the transition from mother’s milk to solid food,” explained Lacey.  Weaning occurs when the cub is five to six months old.

The path to the red panda exhibit remains closed to zoo guests in an effort to minimize disturbances for the new family.  Guests can sometimes see Junjie, the cub’s father, lounging on branches in the exhibit.

Maliha is weighed regularly to ensure that she is receiving appropriate maternal care.  She has more than quadrupled her birth weight of 139 grams and now weighs 545 grams (about 1.25 pounds).

The breeding of red pandas is overseen by the Species Survival Plan (SSP), a program of the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA).  The goal of the SSP is to maximize genetic diversity in zoo-dwelling populations of endangered and threatened animals.

Red pandas are native to the forested foothills of the Himalaya Mountains in China and Nepal, where they feed primarily on bamboo.  They are classified as “Vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Though red pandas share a name with the famed black-and-white giant pandas, the two are not closely related.  The name “panda” comes from the Nepalese word ponya, which means “bamboo-eater.”

Zoo babies are sponsored by Lutheran Children’s Hospital.  Click on the photos to enlarge:

Posted in: Baby Animals, Central Zoo, Red Panda, Zoo News