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tasmanian devil

Tasmanian Devils Returning to Zoo

After an 11-year absence, Tasmanian devils will soon return to the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo as part of an Australian program to save these unique animals from extinction.

“We are very eager to share Tasmanian devils with our fans and to participate in an important conservation effort,” said Zoo Director Jim Anderson.

The Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo was selected to receive Tasmanian devils from Australia through the Save The Tasmanian Devil Program, which is administered by the Australian government.  It is not yet known how many Tasmanian devils will come to Fort Wayne or when they will arrive.

A parasitic transmissible cancer known as Devil Facial Tumor Disease has wiped out nearly 70% of the wild Tasmanian devil population in the past decade.  The devils slated to arrive in Fort Wayne will be disease-free and will be part of an “insurance population” for this endangered species.  This insurance population could serve as a back-up in the event that Tasmanian devils became extinct in the wild.

From 1987-2004, the zoo housed 12 Tasmanian devils, more than any other North American zoo.  One of these devils was Coolah, who was the last Tasmanian devil living anywhere in the world outside of Australia when he died in 2004.

“Our expertise with Tasmanian devils and commitment to caring for this species most likely played a role in our selection by the Australian government,” said Anderson.

The Tasmanian devils will be exhibited in the Australian Adventure, which is currently undergoing a $7 million renovation.

Native only to the Australian island of Tasmania, Tasmanian devils have long fascinated Americans, especially as the wildly spinning cartoon version “Taz” grew in popularity.  These furry black marsupials (pouched mammals) are about the size of a small raccoon.  Tasmanian devils are listed as Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Click on the photos to enlarge:

capuchin monkey and pumpkin

Pumpkin Playtime

Animals and pumpkins may seem like an unlikely pairing, but they are a big hit at the zoo.  With so many pumpkins here for the Wild Zoo Halloween, zoo keepers are grabbing gourds to use as enrichment with the animals.

Enrichment is the practice of introducing novel foods and objects to provide mental and physical stimulation for the animals.  

Pumpkins can be used as toys, food, or a container for treats.  The dingoes’ pumpkins were covered in papier-mâché to make them extra-challenging to open.  The red pandas got pumpkins stuffed with bamboo leaves and grapes, and the capuchin monkeys received jack-o-lanterns with treats inside.  The orangutans simply cracked open the pumpkins and ate the seeds!

Enjoy these photos of zoo critters with their pumpkins – click on the photos to enlarge.

 

kangaroo

Hoppy…er, Happy Birthday, Kangaroo!

Mako the kangaroo got extra attention on his 12th birthday last week, and none of the 23 other eastern grey kangaroos in the mob were complaining. “He was more than willing to share his birthday treat,” said zoo keeper Marian Powers.

Mako got special treatment because he IS special: he’s the only adult male in the mob and has fathered 12 joeys here (with more possibly on the way). His birthday “cake” was a tasty combination of willow and ash branches, sprinkled with cottonwood and grape leaves.

“When we delivered the cake, Mako actually shied away from it,” says zoo keeper Kierra Klein. “We think he prefers to stay out of the spotlight.”

 

As dozens of zoo guests gathered to watch the birthday festivities, Mako stretched out and gave himself a good belly scratch while the female ‘roos and their joeys investigated – then devoured – the leafy cake.

 “Overall, Mako’s birthday celebration was pretty low-key, which fits with his relaxed personality,” says Powers. Perhaps more of us should follow Mako’s example of how to spend the perfect birthday: After nibbling on his cake, he lounged by the pool (actually the small pond in the Kangaroo Walkabout) for the rest of the day.  Hoppy Birthday, Mako!

Learn more about eastern grey kangaroos.