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Wrinkled Hornbill

Aceros corrugatus

Quick Facts

Scientific name: Aceros corrugatus
Class: Bird
Weight: 3.5 pounds
Life span: 20 to 30 years
Conservation status: Near threatened
Number of offspring: 2 to 3 eggs at a time

About

I LIVE IN ASIA

The wrinkled hornbill is native to the lowland rainforests of Borneo and Sumatra.


I AM AN OMNIVORE

Like many other species of hornbill, the wrinkled hornbill is omnivorous, meaning they eat both plants and animals. Their diet largely consists of fruits with fine seeds, but they will also consume small animals such as frogs, snails, and lizards.


WRINKLED HORNBILLS ARE SOCIAL

Wrinkled hornbills are somewhat social. They typically live in monogamous pairs or in small groups.


TOUCAN PLAY AT THIS GAME

The wrinkled hornbill is most notably known for its vibrant colored beak, much like the toucan. However, there is absolutely no relation between the wrinkled hornbill and the toucan. They come from two completely different families of birds and live on opposite sides of the globe.


HELPING THE WRINKLED HORNBILL IN THE WILD

The Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo provides financial support to the Hornbill Research Foundation, which is used to train locals to collect data on hornbills, in order to secure their populations for the future.


I AM IMPORTANT TO MY ECOSYTEM

Wrinkled hornbills play an important role in seed dispersal in their natural habitat. Rainforest health and diversity relies heavily on this avian species.


Conservation

Learn more about our efforts, our conservation partners around the world, and the simple steps you can take to contribute.

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